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Joel Oulette

Joel Oulette, actor,

Joel Oulette played the role of Jimmy in the feature film Monkey Beach and Jared in the series Trickster.

Also see: Cascade in the Soo.

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

Chasing Tears (2018, short)

Parallel Minds (2020)
Monkey Beach (2020)
Abducted (2021)
Cascade (2022)

TV Series – Cast:
Trickster (2020)

TV Series – Guest appearances:
Tribal (2020)
Two Sentence Horror Stories (2021)
Chateau Laurier (2021)

Monkey Beach, movie, poster,

Cascade in the Soo

Cascade in the Soo, image,
Joel Oulette, Sara Waisglass, Greg Bryk. Image supplied.

Cascade in the Soo
by Staff Editors

(July 15, 2021 – Sault Ste. Marie, ON) Edge Entertainment co-founders and producers Rosalia Chilelli and Jennifer Pun have announced the start of production on the wilderness thriller, Cascade. Directed by Egidio Coccimiglio (Compulsion) and co-starring Sara Waisglass (Ginny & Georgia, Degrassi: Next Class, Degrassi: The Next Generation), CSA Best Actor nominee Joel Oulette (Trickster, Monkey Beach, Chateau Laurier), and Greg Bryk (Departure, The Handmaid’s Tale, Bitten), the feature is being shot in and around Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario and will continue until July 30, 2021.

Cascade, based on a screenplay by Ed Mason, follows 17-year-old, Alex (Waisglass), a teen on the cusp of college, grappling with her decision to leave her small-town life and her troubled relationship with her outlaw biker father Nick (Bryk) behind. While on a wilderness hike with her boyfriend, Jesse (Oulette) and friends Vince and Em, they stumble upon a crashed plane filled with cocaine. But when Vince helps himself to the drugs, the teens spiral into a world of escalating violence. To survive, Alex weaponizes her ingenuity, forcing her to outwit a ruthless gang and face an enemy far worse than drug smugglers.

“We are thrilled to have Ginny & Georgia breakout talent Sara Waisglass lead our incredible cast including rising star Joel Oulette and veteran actor Greg Bryk in our wilderness thriller that pits teens against gangs, and a daughter against her father amidst the stunning backdrop of the northern boreal forest. Cascade is a major milestone for our Sault Ste. Marie-based company and furthers our mandate to produce high quality, character-driven projects with local crews and international appeal,” said Producers Rosalia Chilelli and Jennifer Pun.

Cinematography is by Diego Guijarro (OK Computers, Islands, Beyond Moving), production design by Rose Legacé (Baroness Von Sketch Show, Tall Boyz), costume design by Nola Chaters (The Corruption of Divine Providence, The Christmas Club, Trouble in the Garden) and editing by Roger Mattiussi (Frankie Drake Mysteries, The Indian Detective, Fido).

Cascade is funded by the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation, Ontario Creates, Canadian Federal and Ontario Provincial Tax Credits, Cultural Industries Ontario North, and Prime AD AB. It will be distributed in Canada by levelFILM and release is slated for late 2022/early 2023.

SOURCE: Edge Entertainment.

Midsummer Festival Update

Midsummer Festival Update, image,
Photo licensed by Northernstars.ca from iStock.

Midsummer Festival Update
by Ralph Lucas – Publisher

(July 14, 2021 – Toronto, ON) Here we are in the middle of July, a quiet month for festival news compared to September, but there’s enough going on between now and TIFF to warrant a look. You can click here for a link to the July 2021 film festivals mentioned below.

First up, one of the smaller festivals, Ryerson University Film Festival kicks off on Friday and is over by Monday. For 24 years the Ryerson University Film Festival (RUFF) has been the launching off point for some of Canada’s most promising young filmmakers. This year’s festival will feature 16 thesis films from the Ryerson University School of Image Arts’ graduating class.

Also starting on Friday, audiences across Canada can enjoy a weekend of free short films thanks to a new summer screening program, Films Where You’re At. Presented by the St. John’s International Women’s Film Festival and running from July 16 to 18, they will offer up 13 short films crafted in Newfoundland and Labrador.Viewer discretion is advised and there’s more information online.

Vincenzo Guzzo.
The irrepressible Vincenzo Guzzo, President and CEO of Cinémas Guzzo, who we interviewed a few weeks ago will be honoured this weekend. He is the 2021 recipient of the Italian Contemporary Film Festival (ICFF) Award of Excellence. The award will be presented at the Closing Night Gala and Awards Ceremony of this year’s Lavazza Drive-In Film Festival, co-organized with Toronto’s CHIN Radio/TV and in partnership with Ontario Place, on Saturday, July 17, at Ontario Place.

For the second year in a row, imagineNATIVE will partner with the City of Toronto for DriveInTO to bring a night of free film programming at Ontario Place! Starting Tuesday, July 27, at 9:30 PM, imagineNATIVE will screen Darlene Naponse’s Falls Around Her, starring Tantoo Cardinal. Falls Around Her was the opening gala film at the 2018 imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival where it won the Air Canada Audience Choice Award. Click here for more info.

For our loyal readers in Manitoba, the Gimli Film Festival continues until the 25th and there is still plenty to see. Find the link on our July Film Festivals page.

August is only a couple of weeks away and one of the great Canadian film festivals opens in Montreal early in the month. Fantasia launches on August 5. Our Québec correspondent Maurie Alioff will have more on Fantasia later this month.

The smattering of Canadian film festivals in the summer months explodes come September when we have 12 Canadian festivals listed and we’re sure there are more. The cheeky Toronto Independent Film Festival (TIFF) and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) both kick off on September 9 in Toronto and run until the 18th. TIFF, the International one, already has its digital component lined up and ticket packages are available now. Anyone anywhere in Canada with an Internet connection can access those films. With the relaxing of many of the COVID-19 rules, there will be some in-theatre screenings following all of the safety guidelines.

The Toronto Indie claims their festival is for “truly independent films, and a headline event for micro-budget and no-budget films in North America.” This showcase of as yet undiscovered filmmakers will screen at the Carleton Cinema, known for its support of indie filmmakers.

A quick rundown of some of those other festivals include the Montreal Stop Motion Film Festival, FIN Atlantic Film Festival, Cinéfest Sudbury, Toronto Palestine Film Festival, the Montréal International Black Film Festival, the Ottawa International Animation Festival and the Calgary and Vancouver International film festivals. We’ll have more details on those and other festivals as we move closer to September, but you can click here for more information about these and other September 2021 film festivals.

If we missed your festival and you would like a free listing on Northernstars, simply email us.

Northernstars logo imageRalph Lucas is the founder and publisher of Northernstars.ca. He began writing about film and reviewing movies while in radio in Montreal in the mid-1970s.

Adam Litovitz

B: August 17, 1982 in Toronto, Ontario
D: June 16, 2019 in Toronto, Ontario

Adam Litovitz was 36 when he died in Toronto. He was a screenwriter, composer and actor. We list his credits as a Screenwriter first.

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

Three Movements (Co-writer, 2013, short)
Whispers and Shoulders (Co-writer, 2015, short)
Octavio is Dead! (Story editor, 2018)

Credits as a Composer:
Year of the Carnivore (2009)

Jooj: Shoulders and Whispers (VR-2015, short)
Whispers and Shoulders (2015, short)
Octavio is Dead! (2018)

Credits as an Actor:
Jooj: Shoulders and Whispers (VR-2015, short)
Whispers and Shoulders (2015, short)

Octavio is Dead!, movie, poster,

The Uncanny

88 minutes – Horror
Language: English
Release date: August 26, 1977 (Canada) April 4, 1978 (United Kingdom)
Production company: Cinévidéo, The Rank Organization
Canadian distributor: Astral Films
U.K. distributor: Rank Film Distributors

The Uncanny is known as an anthology film. Within the same film, there are three different stories held together by the presence of cats. It opens in Montreal when writer Wilbur Gray (Peter Cushing) visits his publisher Frank Richards (Ray Milland) to discuss his new book about cats. Gray believes cats are supernatural creatures, the devil in disguise. He tells three tales to illustrate his thoughts:
– The first is set in London in 1912 and centres on Miss Malkin, a wealthy woman who rewrites her will leaving her fortune to her cats rather than to her nephew Michael. Her maid Janet, also the mistress of Michael, steals one copy of the will from the lawyer’s briefcase and tries to destroy the original copy which is kept in the safe. When Miss Malkin sees her attempt, Janet kills her. The cats avenge Miss Malkin’s death.
– In 1975, in the Province of Quebec, the orphan Lucy comes to live with her aunt Mrs. Blake, her husband, and her cousin Angela after the death of her parents in a plane crash. Lucy brings her only friend, the cat Wellington, but her mean cousin forces her parents to get rid of Wellington. Lucy uses her mother’s book of witchcraft to avenge Wellington.
– And in 1936, in Hollywood, the actor Valentine De’ath (Donald Pleasence) replaces the blade of a fake pendulum to kill his actress wife, and give his young mistress and aspiring actress Edina a chance. His wife’s cat avenges her death.

The British poster for The Uncanny was scanned from an original in the Northernstars Collection.
Production began in Montreal on November 16, 1976.

The Uncanny, movie, poster,

Crew:

Producer:

Claude Héroux
René  Dupont
Milton Subotsky

Executive Producer:

Harold Greenberg
Robert A. Kantor
Richard R. St. Johns

Director:

Denis Héroux

Screenwriter:

Michel Parry

Cinematographer:

Harry Waxman

Editor:

Michel Guay
Keith Palmer
Peter Weatherley

Composer:

Wilfred Josephs

Production Designer:

Wolf Kroeger
Harry Pottle

Costume Designer:

Nicoletta Massone
Joyce Stoneman

Cast: Roles:

Peter Cushing
Ray Milland
Susan Penhaligon
Joan Greenwood
Roland Culver
Simon Williams
Donald Pilon
Alexandra Stewart
Chloe Franks
Katrina Holden Bronson
Renée Girard
Samantha Eggar
Donald Pleasence
John Vernon
Catherine Bégin
Jean LeClerc
Sean McCann

Wilbur Gray
Frank Richards
Janet
Miss Malkin
Wallace
Michael
Mr. Blake
Mrs. Joan Blake
Angela Blake
Lucy
Mrs. Maitland
Edina Hamilton
Valentine De’ath
Pomeroy
Madeleine
Barrington
The Inspector

Nine Canadian Films You’ve Probably Never Seen

Nine Canadian Films You’ve Probably Never Seen, image,

(July 12, 2021 – Toronto, ON) Editor’s Note: The following article was originally published late in 1994 in Issue 4 of Take One Magazine. Please keep this in mind when reading as any reference it contains to time, for example, will seem badly out of date. We offer it here as an historical perspective on the state of Canadian film 27 years ago and one writer’s opinion about 9 specific films. The original article listed members of the cast and crew before discussing each production’s merits, but we have deleted that content as we have provided links to each of the films covered in this article. Northernstars acquired the digital assets of Take One in 2007, two years after it had ceased publishing.

The Best Canadian Films You’ve Probably Never Seen
by Geoff Pevere

(Winter, 1994 – Toronto, ON) Considering how difficult it is to see Canadian movies even under the most generous of circumstances, this admittedly is something of an exercise in hair–splitting. Nevertheless, there are certain Canadian movies that, for one reason or another, are even less visible than most and which, in many cases, are infinitely superior to the chosen few that do enjoy some form of fleeting notoriety. Therefore, what follows is a highly subjective account of some of the undeservedly lost Canadian movies of recent years: those films that, after a festival screening or two, simply dropped through the floorboards of our cultural memory.

Nine Canadian Films You’ve Probably Never Seen, image,
La Bête lumineuse (1982)

A group of men depart for a weekend hunting trip in rural Quebec. Among them is a man—an earnest, philosophical teacher/poet—who is so out of place in this macho roundelay of drinking, swearing and shooting he soon becomes an even more pathetic victim of hormonal persecution than the moose the men have come to kill. By film’s end, he will be subjected to forms of systematic humiliation that, ugly as they are, speak volumes about the conforming agenda that motivates so much ritualized male bonding. Interesting as that may be, it’s nothing compared to the fact that this remarkable, virtually unseen film is not a dramatic feature but a documentary, a kind of real–life Deliverance, even more disturbing for its closer proximity to actuality. Directed by Pierre Perrault (Pour la suite du monde) the near–legendary Québecois poet, filmmaking and anthropologist, La Bête lumineuse sunk without a trace after its debut at Cannes, and it isn’t hard to see why: this film suggests there’s something fundamentally ugly in our cultural conception of masculinity, something that makes sport of attacking anything that refuses to play by the rules.

Clearcut (1991)

Dances with Wolves this ain’t. The mere presence of Graham Greene in Clearcut, a ruthless, blood splattered adaptation of M.T. Kelly’s novel “A Dream like Mine” merely underscores what it was about this quickly disappearing film’s message so many clearly didn’t want to hear. Directed by Polish émigré Richard Bugajski (the banning of whose anti–government film The Interrogation drove him to leave his country in the first place), the film attacks the smug liberal pieties of so many moves about racial issues by daring to suggest that sometimes action, and violent action, speaks far more eloquently than words. And words are what its central character, a Toronto attorney representing a native community in a logging dispute, can’t seem to stop spewing. Even when kidnapped by a sinister native man (played terrifyingly by Greene) determined to mete out a little overdue payback to white society, our “hero” (Ron Lea) keeps on trying to do what it is he’s been trained to do at least since law school: negotiate, reason and compromise. Not here pal, and that’s what probably consigned this flawed but daring film to instant oblivion: far from posting liberal tolerance as part of some sort of solution, Bugajski sees it as a big part of the problem.

Candy Mountain (1987)

In tone, this is an odd throwback to the restless road cinema of the late 1960s and early 1970s, and in narrative terms a curious reversal of the east–west trajectory of Goin’ down the Road. Beat recluse Robert Frank’s movie (his first in years) may be the only film to see eastern Canada as a mystical place—a wind–whipped Oz where reclusive geniuses retreat and callow acolytes follow. Kevin O’Connor plays a morose but ambitious young musician determined to track down a Salingeresque guitar maker played by Harris Yulin (playing Frank, one supposes). As usual with such fare, however, the final destination is ultimately far less significant than the scenery along the way, which in this case includes low key encounters with everyone from Tom Waits to Leon Redbone. Languid but oddly absorbing, this is the missing link between Donald Shebib and Bruce McDonald.

La Guerre oubliée (1987)

This film is one of the key documentary experiments of the last decade and is virtually unknown outside of Quebec. Operating from the assumption that the Conscription Crisis of the First World War was one of the defining moments in 20th–century French–English relations in Canada, director Richard Boutet embarks on a cinematic exploration of history that is every bit as interested in issues of form as it is fact. Not that the two are even remotely separable, of course, which is the film’s point. By combining such conventional documentary elements as first–person testimony and stock footage with staged cabaret and dramatic sequences, La Guerre oublée is a pointed investigation of the epistemology of history itself: who makes it, who records it and how those modes of recording structure what it is we remember. In other words, far from a self–indulgent exercise in bending documentary aesthetic (which is does admirably anyway), Boutet’s film is also about the role documentary itself has played in the long, hesitant march of 20th–century Canadian history.

A Life (1986)

An obsessive account of obsession, A Life was shot over the course of six years, and edited with a formal precision that recalls Robert Bresson in a particularly dark mood. Frank Cole’s wordless account of a soul unhinging isn’t just one of the stranger personal movies of the past decade, it’s one of the most radical expressions of that time–worn Canadian theme, the alienated individual. Featuring the director as a man who spends the first half of the movie obsessively sealing an empty apartment following a woman’s departure, and the second half lost and wandering the Sahara (which is where Cole perilously filmed it), A Life replicates the often frankly disturbing experience of being trapped inside someone else’s neurosis. Thus, while it’s hardly pleasant or inviting, it definitely exerts a distinct, compulsive allure. Original, difficult and miraculous simply for its existence (how did this guy get it made?), Frank Cole’s A Life stands as the most extreme expression of the solipsistic impressionism that swept over English–Canadian independent films during the 1980s. Imagine Atom Egoyan without the warmth.

Low Visibility (1984)

A Canadian riff on Herzog’s The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Patricia Gruben’s first feature is about an accident victim (Lillo) found wondering in the mountains near a plane crash site. Taken to a hospital, the mute Mr. Bones (so named for the bones he clung to when picked up) proves absolutely resistant to all tests based on logic, reason or even speech, but utterly responsive to such “nonsense” as games, puns and sing–a–longs. In other words, Mr. Bones’s experience, whatever it was, has effectively loosed his moorings from the bounds of empirical thought, which makes the agents of official reason, such as the doctors and the police, determined to dismiss him as simply crazy. Not so Gruben, who sees in this character a possibility for alternative forms of reason and perception; he’s kind of a rebel without a clue. Like La Bête lumineuse, a film about language and power, Gruben’s Low Visibility is obviously more whimsical and allegorical, but no less provocative for its implications.

Sonatine (1984)

Considering the entrenched Canadian predilection toward states of disenfranchisement, it’s no surprise that so many of our movies, from Nobody Waved Good–Bye (1964) to Family Viewing (1986), have been about teens, a cultural sub–group for whom such comprise is a way of life. But Sonatine, former actress Micheline Lanctôt’s second feature, marks some distinct territory of its own. The story of two upper–middle–class teenage girls who have allowed their sense of social detachment to swell to a purple romantic impulse, Lanctôt’s film may be understanding of the girls’ condition (and God knows, their lives are rendered pretty bleak), but it never quite separates their plight from the realm of self–indulgent, bourgeois behaviour. It is, in other words, much less an attempt to pander to inchoate adolescent rebelliousness than a critical examination of both it and the society that makes it almost necessary. Austere, but often powerful.

Undivided Attention (1987)

Most good road movies value journey over destination, and all are, to one extent or another, about how those journeys alter the most fundamental assumptions of the traveller’s world view. Perhaps this is why the road movie is a narrative form that seems to come as naturally to Canadians as Westerns (another form of road movie altogether) come to Americans, and certainly this is why, stripped to its barest formal elements, the road movie can provide the basis for as eloquent a meditation on perception itself as it does in Chris Gallagher’s Undivided Attention. While following a couple across the country in a top–down coupe, the movie makes numerous pit stops at the outer limits of seeing itself. Strapping cameras to everything from typewriter carriages to shovels, Gallagher’s absorbing, feature–length non–narrative constantly forces us to question the authority of our own perceptions—it de–centers our confident subjectivety. It places all points of view on an equal level, which allows us to consider the extent to which identity itself is determined and reinforced by the position one looks from. And if that is too abstract, consider this: Undivided Attention is also a helluva visual trip, well worth it, even if only for the ride.

Northernstars logo imageThis article by is reprinted from a 1994 issue of Take One. Geoff Pevere is an author, movie critic and broadcaster. Northernstars.ca acquired the digital archives of Take One Magazine in 2007.

Candy Mountain

Candy Mountain, movie, image,

92 minutes – Drama, Road Move, Music,
Language: English
Festival release date: September 1987 (Festival of Festivals – now TIFF)
Release date: February 20, 1988
Production companies: Les Films Vision 4, Les Films Plain-Chant (France), Xanadu Film (Switzerland)
Distributors: International Film Exchange (IFEX), Republic Pictures

A struggling musician sets out from New York to find the legendary guitar maker, Elmore Silk, with whom he hopes to strike a deal to make himself rich and famous. When he reaches Canada and finds Silk, he is faced with the realization that financial gain is nothing compared to the development of one’s artistic ability.
Director Robert Frank said in an interview that Candy Mountain was based on his own life and journey from New York City to Nova Scotia. It won the Silver Seashell Award in 1987 at the San Sebastián International Film Festival. NOTE: The cast and crew was largely non-Canadian, including Robert Frank and co-director Rudy Wurlitzer. It is considered Canadian because of the the investment in the film by the Canadian co-producers. It is a Switzerland-Canada-France production.

Also see: The Best Canadian Films You’ve Probably Never Seen.

Candy Mountain, movie, poster,

Crew:

Producer:

Philippe Diaz
Ruth Waldburger
Tom Rothman

Executive Producer:

Gerald B. Dearing

Co-Producer:

Philippe Diaz
Ruth Waldburger
Tom Rothman

Associate Producer:

Tom Rothman

Director:

Robert Frank
Rudy Wurlitzer

Screenwriter:

Rudy Wurlitzer

Cinematographer:

Pio Corradi

Editor:

Jennifer Augé

Composer:

Music by:
Dr. John
David Johansen
Rita MacNeil
Leon Redbone

Production Designer:

Keith Currie
Brad Ricker

Costume Designer:

Carol Wood

Cast: Roles:

Kevin J. O’Connor
Harris Yulin
Tom Waits
Bulle Ogier
Roberts Blossom
Leon Redbone
Dr. John
Rita MacNeil
Joe Strummer
Laurie Metcalf
Jayne Eastwood
Kazuko Oshima
Eric Mitchell
Mary Joy
Robert Joy
Arto Lindsay
Mary Margaret O’Hara
David Johansen
Tony ‘Machine’ Krasinski
Susan Kirschner
Dee De Antonio
Jose Soto
Bob Maroff
Rockets Redglare
Nancy Fish
Dan Archie Cummings
Liz Porrazzo
Roy MacEachern
Wayne Robson
Eric House

Julius
Elmore Silk
Al Silk
Cornelia
Archie
Leon
Henry
Winnie
Mario
Alice
Lucille
Koko Yamamoto
Gunther
Couple
Couple
Alston
Darlene
Keith Burns
Musician
Suzie
Lou Sultan
Musician’s Son
Gas-station Attendant
Van Driver
Maid
Gas-station Owner
Lola
Customs Officer
Buddy Burke
Doctor

Stephanie MacDonald

Stephanie MacDonald, actress,

As well as making her screen acting debut playing the role of Gretyl in 2 episodes of Sex & Violence in 2013, Stephanie MacDonald also worked behind the scenes as a Production Assistant on 6 episodes of the series.

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

Splinters (2018)
Baggage (2019, short)

Disco Apocalypse (2020, short)
Bone Cage (2020)
Gathering Limits (2020, short)
Dawn, Her Dad & the Tractor (2021)

TV Series – Guest appearances:
Sex & Violence (2013)

Bone Cage, movie, poster,

Dawn, Her Dad & the Tractor, movie, poster,

Christian Murray

Christian Murray, actor,

Christian Murray is an actor, director and screenwriter with more than 30 years of experience as a skilled improviser, character actor and physical theatre specialist. His career includes performances at the Sydney Opera House, The Royal Alex in Toronto, Hong Kong Arts Centre and a past member of the National Art Centre of Canada’s English Theatre’s Theatrical Company in 2011. He is a Merrit Award winner as well as a Gemini and Canadian Comedy Award recipient. In Nova Scotia he has performed on stage with the Neptune Theatre, Mulgrave Road, Ship’s Co., Live Bait, Eastern Front and Festival Antigonish. WE list his credits as an Actor first.

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

Perfect Past (2002)

The Gospel According to the Blues (TV-2010)
SEX! With Hot Robots (2010, short)
Sleeping Beauty (2013, short)
The Healer (2016)
Black Cop (2017)

Bone Cage (2020)

TV Series – Guest appearances:
Lexx (1999)
Made in Canada (1999)

Trailer Park Boys (2007)

Call Me Fitz (2010)
Backbencher (2010)
Haven (2013)
The Mist (2017)
Diggstown (2019)

Trailer Park Boys: Jail (2021)

Credits as a Director:
Our Daily Bread (TV-2020)

Credits as a Screenwriter:
Our Daily Bread (TV-2020)
Young Triffie (2006)

TV Series:
Daily Tips for Modern Living (1998)

This Hour Has 22 Minutes (2000, 2001, 2002)
Talking to Americans (TV-2001)
John Callahan’s Pelswick (2001)

Black Cop, movie, poster,

Bone Cage, movie, poster,

Sam Vigneault

Sam Vigneault, actor,

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

Horizontal Concavity (2017, short)
Masc (2019, short)
Bone Cage (2020)
Tin Can (2020)

Bone Cage, movie, poster,

Ursula Calder

Ursula Calder, actress,
Ursula Calder (l) and Taylor Olson in a publicity still from the movie Bone Cage.

B: in United Kingdom

Ursula Calder (pictured above) is also a stage actress. She played the vivacious, theatre-loving character Terry, a character in the George S. Kauffman and Edna Ferber play Stage Door, which was produced by Dal’s Fountain School of Performing Arts and directed by faculty member Jure Gantar and featuring third-year acting students. She plays he role of Krista, the love interest to Jamie (Taylor Olson) in the 2020 feature film, Bone Cage. Other theatre credits include Macbeth by Fire and Schoolhouse.

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

Bone Cage (2020)
Beakout (2021, short)

TV Series – Guest appearances:
I Am Syd Stone (2021)

Bone Cage, movie, poster,

Red Notice Announced

Red Notice Announced
Promotional photo from Red Notice courtesy of Netflix

Red Notice Announced
by Staff Editors

Pictured above from left to right, Ryan Reynolds, Gal Gadot and Dwayne Johnson costar in the Netflix feature film Red Notice. An Interpol-issued Red Notice is a global alert to hunt and capture the world’s most wanted. But when a daring heist brings together the FBI’s top profiler (Johnson) and two rival criminals (Gadot, Reynolds), there’s no telling what will happen. Dwayne Johnson announced the release date of November 12, 2021 this morning on Instagram and Twitter. Red Notice was written and directed by Rawson Marshall Thurber.



Learn more about Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds.

SOURCE: Netflix

Taylor Olson

Bone Cage, movie, image,
Taylor Olson wrote, directed and stars in the 2020 feature Bone Cage.

Taylor Olson graduated from the Dalhousie University Acting Program. In addition to his career in front of the cameras, after shooting a series of short films, he adapted the award-winning play Bone Cage for the screen and made his feature directorial debut with the film in 2020. It won awards for Best Atlantic Feature, Best Atlantic Director, Best Atlantic Screenplay and Best Atlantic Cinematography at the FIN Atlantic Film Festival in September of 2020. We list his credits as an Actor first.

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

Bring Me Home (2014, short)
Across the Line (voice, 2015)
Your Money or Your Wife (2015)
Salt Stains (2015, short)
Noon Gun (2015)
Don’t Forget to Step (201, short)
Daddy (2015, short)
Behind You (2015, short)
Ransom (2016, short)
Underneath the Makeup, There’s Me (2016, short)
Afraid to Speak (2016)
Hustle & Heart (2016, short)
Ariyah & Tristan’s Inevitable Break-Up (2016)
Dial Tone (2017, short)
I Love You More (2017, short)
Black Cop (2017)
You Ruined Our Life! (2017)
Cut (2017, short)
Perfectly Sane (2017, short)
To Old Age (2017, short)
Thug (2017, short)
Horizontal Concavity (2017, short)
Angels (2018, short)
The Tufts (2018, short)
Hopeless Romantic (2018)
Greeness (2018, short)
Grace (2018, short)
It’s Only Monday (2019, short)
Jerky (2019, short)
Halloween Party 2019)
Masc (2019, short)
You Too, Chuckles (2019, short)
Bad Morning (2019, short)
Spinster (2019)
Hope (2019, short)
Entropic (2019)

The Chris Watts Story (TV-2020)
Keep (2020, short)
Inceldom (2020, short)
Here to Help (2020, short)
Bone Cage (2020)
Beer Bowl (2020, short)
Wooden Nickles (2020, short)
Phone Jack (2020, short)
Tin Can (2020)
I Hate You (2020, short)
Breakout (2021, short)
Dawn, Her Dad & the Trailer (2021)
Endless Row of Trees (2021, short)
Paulie the Pen (2021, short)
Shush (2021)
8:37 Rebirth (2021)

TV Series – Guest appearances:
Mr. D (2014, 2017)
Did He Do It? (2015)
Haven (2015)
Sex & Violence (2015, 2017)
Pure (2017)
Diggstown (2019)

Trailer Park Boys: Jail (2021)

Credits as a Director:
Behind You (2015, short)
Cut (2017, short)
Perfectly Sane (2017, short)
Angels (2018, short)
Grace (2018, short)
Masc (2019, short)
The Date (2019, short)
Hope (2019, short)

Keep (2020, short)
Inceldom (2020, short)
Bone Cage (2020)
I Hate You (2020, short)
Second Wedding (2021, short)

Credits as a Screenwriter:
Behind You (2015, short)
Hustle & Heart (2016, short)
Ariyah & Tristan’s Inevitable Break-Up (2016)
Cut (2017, short)
Perfectly Sane (2017, short)
Angels (2018, short)
Grace (2018, short)
Masc (2019, short)
Hope (2019, short)

Keep (2020, short)
Inceldom (2020, short)
Here to Help (2020, short)
Bone Cage (2020)
I Hate You (2020, short)

TV Series:
Eyes for the Job (2021, 13 episodes)

Credits as a Producer:
Behind You (2015, short)
Afraid to Speak (2016)
Hustle & Heart (2016, short)
Ariyah & Tristan’s Inevitable Break-Up (2016)
I Love You More (2017, short)
You Ruined Our Life! (2017)
Cut (2017, short)
Perfectly Sane (2017, short)
Angels (2018, short)
My Mother’s Armenian Christmas Bread Recipe (2018, short)
Grace (2018, short)
Masc (2019, short)
You Too, Chuckles (2019, short)
Bad Morning (2019, short)
The Date (Co-producer, 2019)
Hope (2019, short)

Keep (2020, short)
Inceldom (2020, short)
Here to Help (2020, short)
Disco Apocalypse (2020, short)
Beer Bowl (2020, short)
Wooden Nickles (2020, short)
I Hate You (2020, short)
Breakout (2021, short)
Endless Row of Trees (2021, short)
Paulie the Pen (2021, short)
Second Wedding (2021, short)
Mulligan (2021, short)

Black Cop, movie, poster,

Spinster, movie, poster,

Bone Cage, movie, poster,

Dawn, Her Dad & the Tractor, movie, poster,

Bone Cage

89 minutes – Drama, Environment,
Language: English
Festival release date: September 17, 2020 (FIN Atlantic Film Festival)
Release date: July 6, 2021
Production companies: Afro Viking Pictures, Bone Cage Productions
Canadian distributor: Level Film

Based on Catherine Banks’ Governor General’s Award-winning stage play, Bone Cage is about a forestry worker named Jamie who operates a wood processor, clear-cutting for pulp. At the end of each shift, he walks through the destruction he has created looking for injured animals, and rescues those he can. His desire to break free from this world is thwarted by the very environment and circumstance he’s trying to escape. Meanwhile his sister, Chicky, has placed her own dreams of leaving town and finding something better on hold while she cares for their ailing father. Note: The cast is listed in credits order.

Bone Cage premiered at the FIN Atlantic Film Festival, picking up awards for Best Atlantic Feature, Best Atlantic Director, Best Atlantic Screenplay and Best Atlantic Cinematography.

Also see: Thom Ernst reviews Bone Cage.

Bone Cage, movie, poster,

Crew:

Producer:

Melani Wood

Director:

Taylor Olson

Screenwriter:

Taylor Olson

Cinematographer:

Kevin A. Fraser

Editor:

Shawn Beckwith

Composer:

Terry Ahearn
James O’Toole

Costume Designer:

Morgan Melnyk

Cast: Roles:

Taylor Olson
Amy Groening
Sam Vigneault
Ursula Calder
Christian Murray
David Rossetti
Stephanie Macdonald
Reid Price
Sebastien Labelle
Ann-Marie Kerr
Bob Mann
Monte Murray
Jacob Sampson
Thom Payne
Koumbie
Morgan Melnyk
Oliver Boyle

Jamie
Chicky
Kevin
Krista
Clarence
Reg
Carol
Danny
Hank
Krista’s Mom
Financial Advisor
Earl
Cop
Minister
Ally
Event Worker
4 Year Old

Nicole Dorsey

Nicole Dorsey, director,

B: in Burlington, Ontario

Nicole Dorsey began making movies with her parents’ video camera and was convinced she wanted to be a director by time she was just 8-years-old. She attended M.M. Robinson High School in Burlington, Ontario and was accepted into a BFA programme in film production at Ryerson University. Her career began when she was 18 working as a part-time props assistant on the Rick Mercer Report. Her work has screened internationally, winning awards in Canada and the United States, including the Irving Avrich Award for Emerging Director at the Toronto International Film Festival. She is now based in Los Angeles. We list her credits as a Director first.

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

Ivadelle (2009, short)
Pop the Grapes (2013, short)
Dennis (2015, short)
Star Princess (2015, short)
Arlo Alone (2018, short)
Black Conflux (2019)

Delta Venus (2022)

TV Series:
Something Undone (2021)

Credits as a Screenwriter:
Dennis (2015, short)
Star Princess (2015, short)
Black Conflux (2019)

Delta Venus (2022)

Credits as an actor:
Delta Venus (2022)

TV Series:
King (2012)

Black Conflux, movie, poster,

Black Conflux

100 minutes – Drama
Language: English
Festival release date:
Release date: June 18, 2021 (St. John’s NL)
Production company:
Distributor: Vortex Media

Black Conflux is set in Newfoundland in 1987 and centres on two lives on a fateful collision course. Jackie is fifteen and is trying to navigate from vulnerable adolescence to approaching adulthood. She is attracted toward Dennis, an older loner who has delusional fantasies of adoring women who are always available at his beck and call. Based on director Nicole Dorsey’s short film Dennis, which played at the RiverRun Festival in 2015.

Also see: Thom Ernst reviews Black Conflux.

Black Conflux, movie, poster,

Crew:

Producer:

Mark O’Neill
Michael Solomon

Director:

Nicole Dorsey

Screenwriter:

Nicole Dorsey

Cinematographer:

Marie Davignon

Production Designer:

Melanie Garros

Art Director:

Hilary Thomson (Set Decoration)

Costume Designer:

Christine Kenny

Cast: Roles:

Ella Ballentine
Ryan McDonald
Luke Bilyk
Kate Corbett
Olivia Scriven
Rayisa Kondracki
Sofia Banzhaf
Stephen Oates
Lawrence Barry
Mike Bruff
Rhiannon Morgan
Steve O’Connell
Yasmin MacKay
Zara Matthews
James Murphy
Amelia Manuel
Evan Mercer
Hannah Wadman-Scanlan
Darryl Hopkins
Megan Jones
Carlos L. Sanyer
Alexis Koetting
Andrew Tremblett
Natalia Hennelly
Judy Hancock
Andrew Kay
John Wadman-Scanlan

Jackie Dunphy
Dennis Smarten
Donovan
Margaret
Amber Murphy
Aunt Augustine
Tracey Mulligan
James
Convenience store clerk
Mall security guard
Brunette Woman
Bartender
Mary
Ellen
Teen boy in mall
Amy
Murray
Fantasy girl on bike
Mr. MacKenzie
Ms. O’Brien
Doctor
Intoxicated Woman
Nick
Susan
Waitress
Max
John Wadman-Scanlan

Marcia Pilote

Sonatine, movie, image,
Pascale Bussières (l) and Marcia PIlote in a promotional still for the 1984 film Sonatine.

Marcia Pilote made her film debut playing the role of Louisette opposite Pascale Bussières in the 1984 feature Sonatine. She played the role of Josianne Martineau in 35 episodes of Chambres en ville.

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

Sonatine (1984)
Toutes les photos finissent par se ressembler (1985)
Tristesse modèle réduit (1987)

Coyote (1992)

TV Series – Cast:
Chambres en ville (1990-1992)

TV Series – Guest appearances:
Scoop II (1993)

Maripier Morin

Maripier Morin, actress,

B: July 7, 1986 in Rivière-du-Loup, Québec

Businesswoman and TV host Maripier Morin made her feature film debut in Denys Arcand’s 2018 film La chute de l’empire Américain. She first gained attention as a contestant on the Quebec-produced reality television series Occupation double (Double Occupancy). She married hockey player Brandon Prust in 2017. She appeared as herself in the 3rd season of the reality series Hockey Wives. She played the role of Sophie Taylor in the 2019 series La faille.

Features & TV Movies:
VR indicates Direct-to-Video Release

La chute de l’empire Américain (2018)
Arlette! (2022)

TV Series – Cast:
Ménage à Trois (host, 2014-2015)
Faites Comme Chez Vous (host, 2015)
La faille (2019)

TV Series – Guest appearances:
Barman (2018)
En audition avec Simon (2018)
Julien Lacroix (2018)
Le jeu (2018)

Web Series:
Planète V (2010-2011)

La chute de l'empire Américain, movie, poster,
Poster courtesy of Les Films Séville.

Sonatine

Sonatine, movie, image,
Pascale Bussières (l) and Marcia PIlote in a promotional still for the 1984 film Sonatine.

91 minutes – Drama
Language: French
Release date: February 24, 1984
Production company: Les Films René Malo
Canadian distributor: Les Films René Malo

Sonatine is about the indifference and incomprehension of adults surrounding two teenage girls, Chantal (Pascale Bussières) and Louisette (Marcia Pilote), who become disillusioned with the world of adults and plan a suicide pact. The film is structured as a triptych, with one segment devoted to each of the two girls as an individual, going through the experiences that cause them to lose faith in humanity, before they plan the suicide pact in the third segment. It is the second feature film directed by the actress Micheline Lanctôt, and was selected as the Canadian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 57th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee. It was nominated for five Genie Award in 1985 and Micheline Lanctôt won for Best Director. It won the Silver Lion at the 41st Venice International Film Festival in September 1984.

Also see: The Best Canadian Films You’ve Probably Never Seen

Sonatine, movie, poster,

Crew:

Producer:

Pierre Gendron

Executive Producer:

René Malo

Director:

Micheline Lanctöt

Screenwriter:

Micheline Lanctöt

Cinematographer:

Guy Dufaux

Editor:

Lucette Bernier
Louise Surprenant

Composer:

François Lanctöt

Costume Designer:

Hélène Schneider

Cast: Roles:

Pascale Bussières
Marcia Pilote
Pierre Fauteux
Kliment Denchev
Ève Gagnier
Marc Gélinas
Pauline Lapointe
Jean Mathieu
Paul Savoie
Christian Platov
Boris Palankov
Jani Pascal
Jean-Jacques Bussières
Ghislaine Bussières
Pierre Giard
Thérèse Morange
Frank Fontaine
Jean Lafontaine
Dennis O’Connor
Yves Hamel
Jean Ricard
Bertrand Roy
Marc Picard
Jean-Jacques Blanchet
Adriana Roach
Juleck Winnicki
Damir Andrei
Laurent Imbault
Yves Jacques

Chantal
Louisette
Fernand
Bulgarian seaman

La guerre oubliée

La guerre oubliée, movie, placeholder,

97 minutes – Docu-drama, World War 1
Language: French
Festival release date: August 24, 1988 (Montréal World Film Festival)
Release date: 1988
Production company: Les Productions Vent d’Est
Canadian distributor:

Crew:

Producer:

Lucille Veilleux

Director:

Richard Boutet

Screenwriter:

Richard Boutet

Cinematographer:

Robert Vanherweghem

Editor:

Francis van den Heuvel

Composer:

Yves Alix

Art Director:

Karine Lepp

Cast: Roles:

Joe Bocan
Eudore Belzile
Jean-Louis Paris
Jacques Godin
Bruno Cordeau
Luc-Martial Dagenais
Gilbert Dupuis
Gilles Labrosse
Madeleine Nadeau
Denis Morneau
Michel Grégoire
Antonio Bourgault
Ernest Deschênes
Marie-Louise Deschênes
Charles-Émile Dionne
Marie-Louise Dorion
Cyrile Dufour
Jean Duguay
Annette Filiatrault
Annette Goudreault
Octave Jobin
Edmond Langlais
Georges Marcoux
Lionel Paquet
Léa Roback
Jean Thibault
Pierre Auger
Luc Beauchamps
Marcel Bernier
Henri Binet
Mathieu Boivin
Maxim Boutet-Veilleux
Edgar Canuel
Clermont Castonguay
Marie Charland
René Chaumond
Guillaume Chouinard
Noémie Chouinared
Denis Côté 
Philippe Denancourt
Paul Désolets
Vincent Dostaler
Mance Dufresne
Massimo Espositio
Sylvain Fortin
Jean-Pierre Fournier
René Geoffrion
Vincent Houdait
Clément Lavoie
Jean-Noël Lavoie
Jean-Guy Leduc
Jean Lévesque
Pierre-Antoine Marois
Onil Melanéon
Denis Michaud
Bernard Morin
Régis Morin
Mathieu Nadeau
Francis Nelson
Pierre Nolin
Carmel Ouellet
Michel Pelletier
Claude Perrier
Michel Paulin
Julie Proulx
Yves Raymond
Tom Rivest
Marc-Alain Robitaille
Yvon Roy
François Tardif
Serge Turbide

La Madelon
Le petit conscrit
Le cardinal Bégin
Le général Lessard
Le maire
L’aide de camp
Le caporal
Le soldat entreprenant
La mère
Le vendeur de conscrit
Le major
Witness
Witness
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